Who We Serve

Therapy for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC)

We see your resilience, strength, and the range of emotions you may be experiencing and are here to help.

Professional dressed young woman

Therapy… that word brings to mind a lot of things for people. For some, it may bring a sense of relief yet or for others, it can bring up a sense of struggle.

While access to mental health care services is challenging in general, it can be a particularly discouraging experience for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC).

Let’s not get started on the daunting task of even trying to find a BIPOC therapist who looks like you or is at least culturally trained to understand the unique needs/experiences of marginalized people!

So why bother coming into therapy? We know the lack of adequately represented mental health professionals might discourage you from seeking therapy. However, finding a therapist who not only gets you but also wholeheartedly embraces your unique lived experiences can lead to a lot of opportunities for emotional healing and personal growth.

We wish to acknowledge that Changewell Psych cannot fully encompass the diversity of the entire BIPOC community, nor do we intend to do so. As we discussed how to articulate this service on our website within our team, we encountered uncertainty about where to even begin.

Recognizing that the BIPOC community is incredibly diverse, it became clear that representing the range of experiences individuals may seek in therapy posed a challenge. One thing we can be certain of, however, is that when you come to our office you will be genuinely seen, respected, valued, and made space for.

Changewell Psych is dedicated to prioritizing diversity and multicultural training. It is one of the many important reasons why we facilitate a community Multicultural Consultation Team for therapists to learn with one another on how to incorporate all aspects of clients’ identities into treatment.

Does this mean we will always get it right? The simple answer is no. However, our therapeutic approach centers on ensuring that you feel genuinely heard and understood. We practice therapy with cultural humility, rather than cultural competency, because we know that our learning is infinite and never complete.

We recognize that there are areas in our understanding that may still be evolving, and we are dedicated to continuously assessing and improving our awareness in order to better meet your needs.

Why Should I Consider Therapy?

Why should I consider therapy when it has been historically tailored to and associated with white individuals?

Let’s acknowledge that therapy has not always been accessible for minority groups due to various factors such as systematic racism, discrimination, stigma, mistrust, microaggressions, racial trauma, and violence.

Therapy can help one cope with these related experiences. Promoting awareness and understanding of racism/discrimination in a path is not without its challenges. For members of the BIPOC community, we see your resilience, strength, and the range of emotions you may be experiencing as a result of your encounters with racism and discrimination.

Therapy can provide a space for you to express and process feelings such as anger, frustration, sadness, confusion, and even moments of hope and empowerment. Your therapist will provide a safe and supportive space where you can freely express your feelings, concerns, and experiences without judgment. You might also find it worth examining other aspects in your life or uncover patterns to promote mental and emotional wellbeing.

Why Should I Go To Therapy?

Seeking therapy sooner rather than later can have significant benefits for your mental health, well-being, and overall quality of life.

Think about it like brushing your teeth—if you wait all year until you go to the dentist to clean your teeth, it’s going to be quite a laborious and uncomfortable experience to get your teeth all clean when you do go.

Our mental health works the same way and functions most optimally when we preventively attend to it instead of waiting until a crisis. There really is never a bad time to go to therapy.

There may be certain personal attitudes or cultural beliefs that bring up reservations about therapy from yourself, family or your community as a whole. While your family or community may have reservations about therapy due to cultural or personal beliefs and/or historical harm caused by our field, it’s important to prioritize your own emotional and psychological needs.

Therapy can provide a safe and confidential space to explore and address the impact of acculturation (the process of adapting to a new culture) stress, family dynamics, and other factors that may be affecting your mental health. It is helpful to explore generational patterns and heal from harmful ones.

Therapy does not have to only focus on talking about the pain of marginalization and feeling “othered”; this is an open space to celebrate diversity and identity, whether that is through connectedness that can come from collective communities or by embracing a family-oriented perspective that defines who you are.

What If My Therapist Doesn't "Get It"?

It can be disheartening and draining when therapy feels like it’s not addressing your unique experiences and needs as a BIPOC individual.

At ChangeWell, our therapists are specifically trained to work with BIPOC clients, recognizing the impact of systemic racism, discrimination, microaggressions, and racial and intergenerational trauma on mental health.

Our therapists are committed to gaining a deep understanding of your perspective, providing you with the support, validation, and tools necessary to foster healing, resilience, and personal growth.

In fact, ChangeWell is committed to helping you find a therapist that aligns with your needs; whether it is here or with an outside referral. Here are a some questions to ask when meeting with one of our therapists or looking for therapist who is multiculturally sensitive and informed about BIPOC identities:

Can I Talk About Racism, Racial Trauma, and Other -isms?

If this page has not strongly suggested it, the answer is YES! Please talk about all the -isms because remaining silence can be detrimental to our well-being.

Sometimes it feels like your racial identity takes a backseat or is disregarded compared to other identity aspects in life, and we do not want to also include that in your therapeutic experience. Picture a world where each person was given one label to associate with.

In theory, it might make understanding yourself or explaining yourself to others easier if that was all you knew. The reality is people are so much more than one piece of their identity, and we see your intersectional complexity.

We are here to support you in your exploration of all aspects of your identity. It is possible you have experienced multiple forms of oppression or discrimination simultaneously due to your intersectionality (various combined aspects of your identity, such as race, gender, class, age, and sexual orientation that all combine to create YOU).

What Is Racial Trauma?

Racial trauma, which can also be known as racial stress or race-based traumatic stress, refers to the distress (psychological, physical, mental and/or emotional) that can result from experiencing racism, discrimination or prejudice based on one’s race or ethnicity.

The experience(s) can build up to contributing to one feeling helpless, devalued and dehumanized, which can impact many different forms of well-being (anxiety, depression, chronic anger).

Therapy can be instrumental in addressing and coping through these experiences through having that validation and support, using the tools that you have learned and building new ones to use to reduce the stress of racial experiences, building and empowering you to explore these roots of racial trauma and how it manifests in your personal life as well as building resilience and advocacy.

How Can Therapy Help Me?

Our therapists see and validate the immense weight carried by members of the BIPOC community and their unwavering allies. Promoting awareness and understanding of racism/discrimination in a path is not without its challenges.

For members of the BIPOC community, we see your resilience, strength, and the range of emotions you may be experiencing as a result of your encounters with racism and discrimination. Therapy can provide a space for you to express and process feelings such as anger, frustration, sadness, confusion, and even moments of hope and empowerment.

Your therapist will provide a safe and supportive space where you can freely express your feelings, concerns, and experiences without judgment.

Schedule An Appointment

Connect with one of our clinicians today. We offer online therapy in 40+ states.

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